News Releases

News Releases

ORNL's Communications team works with news media seeking information about the laboratory. Media may use the resources listed below or send questions to news@ornl.gov.

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The sensors measure parameters like temperature, chemicals and electric grid elements for industrial and electrical applications. Credit: Carlos Jones/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., July 17, 2018—Brixon, Inc., has exclusively licensed a multiparameter sensor technology from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The integrated platform uses various sensors that measure physical and environmental parameters and respond to standard security applications.
New research about the transfer of heat—fundamental to all materials—suggests that in thermal insulators, heat is conveyed by atomic vibrations and by random hopping of energy from atom to atom.
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., June 28, 2018—A discovery by scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory supports a century-old theory by Albert Einstein that explains how heat moves through everything from travel mugs to engine parts.
Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Summit supercomputer was named No. 1 on the TOP500 List, a semiannual ranking of the world’s fastest computing systems. Credit: Carlos Jones/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy.
OAK RIDGE, Tenn. June 25, 2018  – The US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory is once again officially home to the fastest supercomputer in the world, according to the TOP500 List, a semiannual ranking of the world’s fastest computing systems.
Stealth Mark image 2.jpg
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., June 25, 2018— StealthCo, Inc., an Oak Ridge, Tenn.-based firm doing business as Stealth Mark, has exclusively licensed an invisible micro-taggant from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The anticounterfeiting technology features a novel materials coding system that uses an infrared marker for identification.
A radiologist outfitted with the team’s head-mounted eye-tracking device examines a mammogram. Credit: Hong-Jun Yoon/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., June 19, 2018 – In an effort to reduce errors in the analyses of diagnostic images by health professionals, a team of researchers from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory has improved understanding of the cognitive processes involved in image interpretation.
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OAK RIDGE, Tenn., June 15, 2018 – For decades, biologists have believed a key enzyme in plants had one function—produce amino acids, which are vital to plant survival and also essential to human diets. But for Wellington Muchero, Meng Xie and their colleagues, this enzyme does more than advertised. They had run a series of experiments on poplar plants that consistently revealed mutations in a structure of the life-sustaining enzyme that was not previously known to exist.
ORNL’s Tolga Aytug uses thermal processing and etching capabilities to produce a transparent superhydrophobic coating technology. The highly durable, thin coating technology was licensed by Carlex Glass America, aimed initially at advancing superhydrophob
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., June 13, 2018—Carlex Glass America LLC has exclusively licensed optically clear, superhydrophobic coating technology from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory aimed initially at advancing glass products for the automotive sector. 
Illustration of a nitrogen dioxide molecule (depicted in red and gold) confined within a nano-size pore of an MFM-300(Al) metal-organic framework material as characterized using neutron scattering at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., June 11, 2018 — Led by the University of Manchester, an international team of scientists has developed a metal-organic framework material (MOF) that exhibits a selective, fully reversible and repeatable capability to remove nitrogen dioxide gas from the atmosphere in ambient conditions.
Oak Ridge National Laboratory launches Summit supercomputer.
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., June 8, 2018—The U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory today unveiled Summit as the world’s most powerful and smartest scientific supercomputer.  
Radiochemical technicians David Denton and Karen Murphy use hot cell manipulators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the production of actinium-227.
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., May 31, 2018—The Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory is now producing actinium-227 (Ac-227) to meet projected demand for a highly effective cancer drug through a 10-year contract between the U.S. DOE Isotope Program and Bayer.
Graphical representation of a deuteron, the bound state of a proton (red) and a neutron (blue). Credit: Andy Sproles/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy.
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., May 23, 2018—Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are the first to successfully simulate an atomic nucleus using a quantum computer.
ORNL inventors Bruce Warmack, left, and Nance Ericson display an early prototype of the DC hotstick. Credit: Carlos Jones/Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy.
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., May 21, 2018 – North Carolina-based Hotstick USA has exclusively licensed a direct-current detector technology developed by the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory to help emergency responders safely detect high voltages.
Neutron scattering studies of lattice excitations in a fresnoite crystal revealed a way to speed thermal conduction. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy; graphic artist Jill Hemman
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., May 17, 2018—Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory made the first observations of waves of atomic rearrangements, known as phasons, propagating supersonically through a vibrating crystal lattice—a discovery that may dramatically improve heat transport in insulators and enable new strategies for heat mana
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., May 16, 2018—The American Nuclear Society has designated the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory an ANS Nuclear Historic Landmark, recognizing more than 50 years of isotope production and nuclear fuel cycle research. 
Nanoscale spikes of carbon help catalyze a reaction that generates ammonia from nitrogen and water.
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., May 2, 2018—The search for a more energy efficient and environmentally friendly method of ammonia production for fertilizer has led to the discovery of a new type of catalytic reaction.
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., May 2, 2018—High school students in Anderson and Roane counties are invited to apply for a new summer internship program at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 
Visitors to ORNL’s Lab Day can enjoy activities such as the interactive Traveling Science Fair, which showcases the lab’s diverse research efforts.
April 27, 2018 – Oak Ridge National Laboratory will welcome community members onsite Saturday, June 9, for family-friendly activities, tours, demonstrations and talks to mark the lab’s 75th anniversary.
Neutron interactions revealed the orthorhombic structure of the hybrid perovskite stabilized by the strong hydrogen bonds between the nitrogen substituent of the methylammonium cations and the bromides on the corner-linked PbBr6 octahedra.
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., April 23, 2018 – Neutron scattering has revealed, in real time, the fundamental mechanisms behind the conversion of sunlight into energy in hybrid perovskite materials.
ORNL-designed nuclear fuel cladding is now undergoing tests at Southern Nuclear’s Hatch Nuclear Power Plant in Georgia, with additional tests planned for later this year. Credit: Jason Richards/ Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., April 13, 2018 – A team led by researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a safer cladding for nuclear fuel rods.
Innovation Crossroads
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., April 3, 2018—Oak Ridge National Laboratory today welcomed a second group of technology innovators to join Innovation Crossroads, the Southeast’s only entrepreneurial research and development program based at a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory.
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., March 29, 2018 – James Peery, who led critical national security programs at Sandia National Laboratories and held multiple leadership positions at Los Alamos National Laboratory before arriving at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory last year, has been named associate laboratory director of Global Security at ORNL.
David J. Dean
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., March 29, 2018 – David J. Dean has been named associate laboratory director for Physical Sciences at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, effective May 1.
Researchers work on the delicate wiring of a cryostat, which is like a thermos under vacuum that chills the detectors that are the heart of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The experiment’s 2 cryostats each house 29 germanium detectors—diodes that are reverse b
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., March 26, 2018—If equal amounts of matter and antimatter had formed in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago, one would have annihilated the other upon meeting, and today’s universe would be full of energy but no matter to form stars, planets and life. Yet matter exists now.
From left, Andrew Lupini and Juan Carlos Idrobo use ORNL’s new monochromated, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, a Nion HERMES to take the temperatures of materials at the nanoscale. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., March 13, 2018—A scientific team led by the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory has found a new way to take the local temperature of a material from an area about a billionth of a meter wide, or approximately 100,000 times thinner than a human hair.
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OAK RIDGE, Tenn., March 12, 2018 – A new method to produce large, monolayer single-crystal-like graphene films more than a foot long relies on harnessing a “survival of the fittest” competition among crystals. The novel technique, developed by a team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, may open new opportunities for growing the high-quality two-dimensional materials necessary for long-awaited practical applications.